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White oak (Quercus alba)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Black oak (Quercus tinctoria), British oak, common oak (Quercus pedunculata), durmast oak (Quercus sessiliflora), English oak (Quercus robur), Fabaceae (family), gallotannins, green oak (Quercus virens), holm oak (Quercus ilex), live oak (Quercusvirens), Quebec oak, quercetin, red oak (Quercus petraea, Quercus rubra), royal protector, sessile oak, tanner's bark, tannins (phlobatannin, ellagitannins, gallic acid), turkey oak (Quercus cerris).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Of the many species of oak found all over the world, the white oak (Quercus alba) is found primarily in North America. Although there are many species of the Quercus genus, many are thought to have similar properties. The parts of this tree used medicinally are the inner bark and the galls (growths that are produced in reaction to fungi or insects).
  • Traditionally, Native Americans and European settlers have used white oak for its astringent and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Due to lack of clinical data, it is difficult to determine safety of white oak. Adverse effects associated with white oak include gastrointestinal irritation, nausea, and vomiting, which are theoretically due to its tannin content.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.