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Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 2-Methyl-chiro-inositol, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, acetic acid, aekol, alkaloids, almindelig havtorn (Danish), alpha-linolenic acid, amino acid, Amritscherl (German), anthocyanin, arabinose, argasse (French), argouse (French), argousier (French), artificial sea-buckthorn oil, ascorbic acid, ash, Audorn (German), baie d'argousier (French), baie d'hippophaé (French), beta-carotene, beta-sitosterol, buckthorn, caffeic acid, campherol, carbohydrates, carotene, carotenoids, casuarinin, catechin, Chharma, cinnamic acid, citric acid, common sea-buckthorn, dehydroascorbic acid, dhar-bu (Lao), dhurchuk (Hindi), duindoorn (Dutch), Dünendorn (German), Elaeagnaceae (family), Elaeagnus rhamnoides (L.) A.Nelson, epigallocatechin, espinheiro-marítimo (Portuguese - Brazil), espino armarillo (Spanish), espino falso (Spanish), ethyl glucose, European buckthorn, Fasanbeere (German), fat, ferulic acid, fiber, finbar (Swedish), finnbär (Swedish), flavo-glycoside, flavones, flavonoid, flavonol aglycones, flavonol glycosides, flavonols, folate vitamers, fructose, fruit acid, galactose, gallic acid, gallocatechin, gemeiner Sanddorn (German), gewöhnlicher Sanddorn (German), glucose, glucuronides, grisset, Haffdorn (German), hafþyrnir (Icelandic), harmalol, harmol, havtidse (Danish), havtorn (Swedish, Danish), Hippophae angustifolia Lodd., Hippophae littoralis Salisb., Hippophae rhamnoides, Hippophae rhamnoides cv. Indian Summer, Hippophae rhamnoides oil, Hippophae rhamnoides ssp. sinensis, Hippophae rhamnoideum Saint-Lager, Hippophae sibirica Lodd., Hippophae stourdziana Szabó, homoktövis (Hungarian), isolinoleic acid, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin-3-galactoside, isorhamnetin-3-glucoside, isorhamnetin-3-rutinoside, kaempferol, kárpáti homoktövis (Hungarian), klintepil (Danish), klittorn (Danish), Korallenbeere (German), L-ascorbic acid, leucocyanidin, leucodelphinidin, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, lycopene, malic acid, mannitol, meerdorn, methyl-myo-inositol, mineral salt, minerals, myo-inositol, myricetin, oblepikha, oil, oleic acid, oleum Hippophae, olivella spinosa (Italian), Osyris rhamnoides Scop., paeonin, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, p-coumaric acid, pectin, pentamethylquercetin, peonin, phenolic acids, phosphatides, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phylloquinone, physalien, polyunsaturated fatty acids, Prielbrusie, proteins, protocatechuic acid, pulp oil, purging thorn, quercetin, quinic acid, rakytník řešetlákovitý (Czech), RH-3, Rhamnoides hippophae Moench, rhamnose, rokitnik, rokitnik zwyczajny (Polish), rote Schlehen (German), saccharose, salicylic acid, sallow thorn, Sandbeere (German), Sanddorn (German), sandthorn, sandtidse (Danish), sandtidsel (Danish), sandtorn (Danish), SBL-1, sceitbezien, seabuckthorn, sea-buckthorn, seabuckthorn oil, sea-buckthorn oil, seabuckthorn powder, seed oil, seed residues of Hippophae rhamnoides L., Seedorn (German), serotonin, sha ji (Chinese), shaji (Chinese), silverbuske (Swedish), star-bu (Lao), stearic acid, sterols, støggved (Norwegian), Stranddorn (German), succinic acid, sugar, syringetin, tænnved (Norwegian), tannic acid, tanning agents, tannins, terpenoids, tetrahydrofolate, tindved (Danish, Norwegian), tinnan (Norwegian), tinne (Norwegian), tinnved (Norwegian), tocopherols, tocotrienols, tørn (Norwegian), tornan (Norwegian), tørri (Norwegian), total flavones of Hippophae rhamnoides L. (TFH), trans-resveratrol, triterpenoids, tyrni (Finnish), unsaturated fatty acids, vanillic acid, vitamin B, vitamin B12, vitamin C, vitamin E, water, Weidendorn (German), Weisseldorn (German), xanthophylls, yellow spine, zeaxanthin.
  • Note: Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) should be distinguished from alder buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula), common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), or cascara or California buckthorn (Rhamnus purshiana), although these plants have similar common names.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) is found throughout Europe and Asia, particularly eastern Europe and central Asia. It is popularly consumed throughout the world for its potential impact on health, performance, and disease (1); however, more research is needed before a conclusion may be made on its safety and effectiveness for any human condition. The plant's orange fruit and the oil from its pulp and seeds have been used traditionally for dermatological conditions, coughing and phlegm reduction, and digestive disorders. Promising preliminary clinical evidence has been found on sea buckthorn's use for dry eyes (2;3), atopic dermatitis (4) and burns (5;6).
  • The antioxidant activity of sea buckthorn is well documented (7;8;9;10;11;12;13;14;15;16;17;18;19;20;21). This activity may be the underlying mechanism of sea buckthorn's impact on cancer (22;23), cardiovascular disease (10;24), immune function (25), inflammatory disorders (26), liver disorders (11), radiation-induced injury (27), and ocular disorders (2;3).
  • There is a lack of data regarding the adverse effects of sea buckthorn.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.