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Hyaluronic acid

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Biolon™, Curiosin®, Cystistat®, dermal fillers, DermaLive®, Durolane®, Euflexxa™, Eyestil®, glycosaminoglycan, Healon®, Healon 5®, Healon GV®, Hyalgan®, hyaluron, hyaluronan, hyaluronate, hyaluronic acid, Hylaform®, Hylaform Plus®, hylan, hylan G-F 20, hylan polymers, Hylira IPM Wound Gel™, Juvéderm™, Juvéderm 24HV™, Juvéderm 30™, Juvéderm 30HV™, Juvéderm Ultra™, Juvéderm Ultra plus™, Orthovisc®, Perlane®, Provisc®, Restylane®, sodium hyaluronate, Supartz™, Suplasyn®, Synvisc®, Vitrax®.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Hyaluronic acid is a natural component of connective tissue, including the skin; it is also found in synovial (joint fluid) and vitreous and aqueous tumors, and it plays a critical role in providing volume to skin by retaining water.
  • Hyaluronic acid is commonly used in a wide range of applications, including osteoarthritis, ophthalmic surgery, cancer, and tissue engineering. It may be injected intra-articularly (into the joint) or intradermally (into the skin), and it can be taken orally or applied topically (1;2;3;4;5;6;7). Hyaluronic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as an adjunct to cataract surgery, corneal transplantation, lens implantation, and glaucoma filtering surgery.
  • Hyaluronic acid fillers have become popular dermatological agents in the United States over the past several years. These filler substances are widely used as nontoxic, nonimmunogenic, and relatively harmless injectable alternatives to cosmetic surgery for the treatment of facial lipoatrophy (loss of fatty tissue), particularly in the region of the cheeks and chin. Current hyaluronic acid fillers do not require preinjection skin testing and produce reproducible, longer-lasting, nonpermanent results compared with other fillers, such as collagen (3;8;9;10;11;12). Further clinical trials are indicated for the use of hyaluronic acid (both intrathecal (intrajoint) and oral) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (1;5;6).

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.