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Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Allo-ocimene, arnidiol-3-O-laurate, arnidiol-3-O-myristate, arnidiol-3-O-palmitate, amino acids, Asteraceae (family), bride of the sun, bull flower, butterwort, calendasaponin A, calendasaponin B, calendasaponin C, calendasaponin D, Calendula arvensis L., calendula flower, calendula herb, Calendula micrantha, Calendula officinalis extract, Calendula officinalis flower, Calendula officinalis flower extract, Calendula officinalis flower oil, Calendula officinalis seed oil, Calendulae flos, Calendulae herba, calenduladiol-3-O-myristate, calenduladiol-3-O-palmitate, calendasaponins, calypso orange florensis, Caltha officinalis, carbohydrates, cis-tagetone, clavetón Spanish), Compositae (family), coumarins, cowbloom, death-flower, dihydro tagetone, drunkard gold, Egyptian Calendula officinalis, faradiol-3-O-laurate, faradiol-3-O-myristate, faradiol-3-O-palmitate, Fiesta Gitana Gelb, fior d'ogni (Italian), flaminquillo (Spanish), flavonoids, fleurs de tous les mois (French), gauche-fer (French), gold bloom, Goldblume (German), golden flower of Mary, goulans, gouls, herb of the sun, holligold, holygold, husband's dial, ionone glucosides, kingscup, laser-activated calendula extract (LACE), limonene, lipids, lutein, maravilla, marigold, marigold dye, marigold flowers, marybud, marygold, may orange florensis, methyl chavicol, minerals, monoterpenes, officinosides, oleanolic acid, patulitrin, poet's marigold, pot marigold, mejorana (Spanish), publican and sinner, Ringelblume (German), patuletin, patulitrin, payté wamal, phenolic acids, piperitenone, piperitone, quinines, resins, ruddles, saponins, Scotch marigold, sesquiterpene oligoglycosides, sesquiterpenes, shining herb, solsequia, souci (French), souci des champs (French), souci des jardins (French), steroids, sterols, summer's bride, sun's bride, tannins, terpinolene, tocopherols, triterpendiol monoesters, triterpenes, triterpenoids, ursolic acid, water dragon, yolk of egg.
  • Combination product examples: Estromineral® Gel (isoflavones, Lactobacillus sporogenes, Calendula officinalis extract, and lactic acid); Herbadermal® (calendula, garlic, and St. John's wort); NHED® solution (Calendula flores, garlic (Allium sativum), Verbascum thapsus, St. John's wort (Hypericum perfoliatum), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), and vitamin E); Otikon Otic® solution (herbal extract of calendula (Calendula flores), garlic (Allium sativum), mullein (Verbascum thapsus), and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in olive oil); Traumeel®; and IND 61,164 mouthwash (1).
  • Note: Not to be confused with the common garden or French marigold (Tagetes spp.), African marigold (T. erecta), or Inca marigold (T. minuta).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is commonly known as marigold. It is an annual flower in the Asteraceae or Compositae family. The flower is native to Asia and southern Europe.
  • According to secondary sources, calendula has been used medicinally since the 12th Century, mainly in central Europe and the Mediterranean region. It has been widely used topically to treat minor skin wounds, skin infections, burns, bee stings, sunburn, warts, and cancer. Most scientific evidence regarding its efficacy as a wound-healing agent is based on animal and in vitro studies.
  • Preliminary evidence from one open phase III trial (a randomized, nonblinded, comparison trial, without a placebo arm), suggests that topical calendula ointment may effectively prevent dermatitis related to radiation therapy in breast cancer patients (2).
  • Clinical evidence in support of calendula for any use is lacking.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.