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Organ transplants and HIV/AIDS

Related Terms

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Background

  • Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a combination of drugs used to suppress HIV, enables HIV-infected individuals to live longer lives. Today, most patients are dying from end-stage organ disease and organ failure rather than AIDS-associated opportunistic infections. Since HAART prolongs the lives of HIV patients, it is possible for chronic conditions to progress to organ failure.
  • For instance, HIV patients may experience end-stage liver disease as a complication of chronic hepatitis C virus. Glomeruli diseases are also common among HIV patients, and they may lead to kidney failure. In advance stages of liver or kidney damage, organ transplants may be the patient's only chance of survival
  • In general, about 92,000 people who need kidneys, livers, pancreases, intestines, hearts and lungs are on the U.S. organ transplant waiting list. About 6,500 people died while waiting for an organ transplant in 2005 (almost 18 people a day).
  • Until recently, people who had HIV were not considered good candidates for organ transplantations. Many patients were denied transplants under the assumption that they had shorter life expectancies and less favorable survival rates than other patients in need of transplants. However, now that patients are living longer lives, many groups are reconsidering whether HIV patients should be transplant candidates.
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General Transplant Requirements

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Hiv Transplant Research

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Treatment

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Integrative Therapies

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.